Elliott Fisher Named Director of The Dartmouth Institute

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The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth has named Elliott S. Fisher as the director of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. An internationally recognized leader in health services research and health policy, Fisher is currently the director for Population Health and Policy at The Dartmouth Institute, as well as the James W. Squire Professor of Medicine and Community and Family Medicine at the Geisel School. He is also co-director of the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care.

Elliott Fisher

“It is an important moment in health care,” says Elliott Fisher, an internationally recognized leader in health services research and health policy. (Courtesy of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice)

Since its founding by John Wennberg in 1988, the faculty of The Dartmouth Institute has led the nation in exploring the causes and consequences of unwarranted variations in practice and spending—and in developing policy approaches to addressing them, ranging from shared decision-making to accountable care organizations.

“Dr. Fisher’s work has had tremendous influence on health care policy in this country,” says Dartmouth President Carol L. Folt. “Under his direction, The Dartmouth Institute will continue to be a leader in improving health care delivery and the development of a sustainable health care system.”

Wiley W. Souba, dean of the Geisel School of Medicine, says, “I’m pleased that Elliott has agreed to take on this important role. He is one of the top thinkers in health care delivery science and health policy. Under Dr. Fisher’s leadership, the faculty will continue to tackle the most important and vexing social problems confronting developed and developing countries. We look forward to continued growth and investment in the coming years.”

“It is an important moment in health care,” Fisher says. “Rising health care costs are now recognized as the major threat not only to federal, state and local budgets, but also to personal incomes. We know that much of that spending is wasted on high administrative costs, exorbitant prices, and avoidable discretionary services. Emerging models of payment and care delivery offer the promise of both better care and lower costs.”