Dartmouth and Peru Partnering to Improve Lives

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Read the full story at Geisel School of Medicine news.

Carla Tafur, Chip Souba, Raul Acosta, Jaime Bayona

Left to right: Carla Tafur, emergency medicine physician at the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia; Chip Souba, dean of the Geisel School of Medicine; Raul Acosta, chief of emergency medicine at the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia; and Jaime Bayona, director of Global Health Programs and Practice at The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science, Geisel assistant professor of community and family medicine, and leader of Dartmouth’s Peru Program. The Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia will serve as a key training site for Geisel medical students in Peru. (photo courtesy of the Geisel School of Medicine)

Guided by Dartmouth’s tradition of developing global citizens, the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth is forging new partnerships in Peru to create educational opportunities and improve lives.

Dartmouth medical and undergraduate students, and a leadership team from the medical school spent time in Peru this summer learning about the Peruvian health care delivery system and public health challenges, examining health needs in low-income communities, and exploring ways to partner with the Peruvian government, and academic, health care, and community organizations.

“Peru is a natural partner for Dartmouth in global health work,” said Chip Souba, dean of the Geisel School of Medicine. “It has wonderful diversity among its people and regions, a strong spirit to improve lives, and a tradition of excellence in medicine and education.”

“Partnering with Peru offers important educational experiences for our students, particularly with underserved communities,” added Souba. “They build their empathy, clinical skills, and leadership capabilities . . . which are integral to solving health care’s most vexing problems…whether in Peru or our country.”

One immediate result from the visit includes the Geisel school joining forces with the Arenal Alto-Villa Maria del Triunfo community, along with the Visionarios community organization, to construct a small library within this impoverished area.

“In this partnership, the Geisel School of Medicine and Dartmouth are using a community-needs driven approach, starting with visiting the leaders and families of El Arenal Alto,” said Jaime Bayona, director of Global Health Programs and Practice at The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science, Geisel assistant professor of community and family medicine, and leader of Dartmouth’s Peru Program. “We aim to build a sustainable, mutually beneficial partnership, putting in practice global experiences for local solutions with high impact in the community we would like to serve.”