2011 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at Dartmouth College

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MLK bannerDartmouth’s nearly month-long Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration will be held January 6 through 28, 2011. This year’s theme, “Injustice Anywhere is a Threat to Justice Everywhere,” was inspired by a letter Dr. King wrote from the Birmingham jail on April 16, 1963. The 2011 program features a wide range of events, including two performances of The Shipment, written by Korean-American playwright and director Young Jean Lee, at the Hopkins Center for the Arts on January 7 and 8; a keynote address on January 17 by Bryan Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative; and a concert featuring world-renowned folk singer Noel Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul & Mary on January 22. The complete schedule is available on Dartmouth’s Martin Luther King Jr. website. Most events are open to the public.

Community Faith Celebration with Diane Nash: How Students Changed Nashville and the Nation

In 1960 at age 22, Diane Nash became the leader of the Nashville sit-ins that led to the desegregation of the city’s lunch counters. A key figure in the Civil Rights Movement, Nash was chairman of the Nashville Student Movement, a founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and a major participant in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Birmingham Campaign and Selma Voting Rights Movement. This celebration of faith also features performances by Ujima dance troupe, the Dartmouth College Gospel Choir, the Aquinas House Choir, and For Your Glory. A reception will follow in the Hanover Inn.

Sunday, January 16, from 2–3:30 p.m. · Rollins Chapel

Keynote Address

Bryan Stevenson

Keynote speaker Bryan Stevenson is professor of law and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative. (photo courtesy of Hopkins Center)

Bryan Stevenson, a New York University law professor and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, is the keynote speaker for Dartmouth’s 2011 Martin Luther King Jr. celebration. Stevenson has won national acclaim for his work challenging bias against the poor and people of color in the criminal justice system. A graduate of Harvard Law School and the Harvard School of Government, he has developed community-based reform litigation aimed at improving the administration of criminal justice. Free tickets will be available at the Hopkins Center Box Office beginning Tuesday, January 11 at 12 p.m. for all Dartmouth ID holders and 10 a.m. on Thursday, January 13 for the general public (limit four tickets per person). A reception will follow at the Top of the Hop.

Monday, January 17, at 7 p.m. · The Moore Theater · 646-3749

Music for Change with Noel Paul Stookey and Company

Part of a full day of social change music programming, this rousing evening of song, film, and inspiration is hosted by Noel Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul & Mary and his daughter Liz Stookey Sunde. The work of Public Domain Foundation Music2Life award winners Amy Carol Webb and Josh White Jr. will also be highlighted.

Noel Paul Stookey performing on guitar

Noel Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul & Mary will host an evening of song and film at Spaulding. (photo courtesy of Liz Stookey Sunde)

In addition to sharing their music, these activist artists are featured in the evening’s two documentary films, Our Living History and Songbird, which illustrate how their talents are used for change in their communities. Free tickets will be available at the Hopkins Center Box Office beginning Tuesday, January 11 at 12 p.m. for all Dartmouth ID holders and 10 a.m. on Thursday, January 13 for the general public (limit four tickets per person).

Saturday, January 22, from 7:30–9:30 p.m. · Spaulding Auditorium · Hopkins Center for the Arts

Lifted: Music Matters to YOUHouston Rapper Baby Jay with Student Performers

Baby Jay

Rapper Baby Jay will perform with student groups January 22 at Collis Common Ground. (photo courtesy of Baby Jay)

With the release of his debut hip-hop album Keepin It Real, up-and-coming 19-year-old Houston-based rapper Baby Jay delivers a message of unity, hope, and encouragement to today’s youth. Baby Jay’s music addresses adversities in the lives of young people, encouraging the rejection of drugs, violence, teen pregnancy, and peer pressure and inspiring other students to stand strong behind their beliefs.

At this year’s Lifted, Baby Jay joins a variety of student performing groups for an evening of dance, music, spoken word, and other forms of expressive art presented in commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Past participants in Lifted have included SoulScribes, the Dartmouth Chinese Dance Troupe, Sheba dance troupe, Dartmouth Argentine Tango Society, the Ceili Irish Dancers, and the Occom Pond Singers. Playing to capacity crowds for the past four years, Lifted undoubtedly will mesmerize audiences once again.

Saturday, January 22, from 10 p.m. to midnight · Collis Common Ground